Search

traduire/vertaal

enfrdeitptrues
Compreshan asks "Who ah Di Dancehall King?'

Compreshan asks "Who ah Di Dancehall King?'

Rate this item
(0 votes)
Dancehall artiste Compreshan is courting controversy with the provocative single, 'Who ah Di Dancehall King?'  which goes against popular sentiment by not giving the nod to current dancehall kingpin Vybz Kartel. 

"The single is surrounding who should be crowned King of the Dancehall, and Beenie kinda get the edge because mi deejay: Beenie say hold on Yellow, don't go weh wid the prize/I have more hits than most other guys/most number one that everybody comprise'. Beenie get a huge big up, he has the Grammy advantage even though Shabba has two," Compreshan said, laughing. 

 

The single, released on his own Earsdrunk label in March 2019, is available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Google Play and YouTube. 

 

"The response has been great so far, people gravitate to it  because of the lively  debate as to who should be crowned king of the dancehall," he said. 

 

Born Aeyon Garfield Virgo, he grew up in Alexandria St. Ann, where he attended York Castle High school. After leaving school, he dabbled in music for a few years and recorded his first single, 'Nah Stop Watch Out di Good Good', a counteraction to Ishawna's hit, 'Good Good'.

 

While  working at Tyre Warehouse, he was discovered by Richie Royal, CEO of Richie Royal Production, via his then manager Markland Burton. Richie Royal was impressed by his gravelly delivery, and recorded  the single,  "Bad Road" which criticized the police force's crackdown on motorists even while violent crime skyrocketed. 

 

He then followed up with the aforementioned 'Who ah di Dancehall King?'. 

 

Over the years, Compreshan has taught himself how to make beats, record himself, mix and produce. He has established his own label, Earsdrunk Music. 

 

"I plan to distribute a mixtape soon to grab the interest of the public," he said.

 

He has released a number of other singles direct to video sharing site, YouTube. These songs include 'One and Breed', 'Tyre Roll Dance', 'Equal Lies', and Love My Slimmas. 

 

"I will be doing a project with the artiste Geebwoy in Ghana,  a song called 'Zongo'.  Zongo means ghetto in Ghana and I am expecting big things because this is giving me a chance to tap into the huge African dancehall market," he said.  

 

 

Read 239 times

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

Download our Free App

Latest Comments